The Truth About Getting Deeper Sleep

Do you wake up TO every little noise or movement at night? Such is the dilemma of the light sleeper. And while being a light sleeper isn’t necessarily a bad thing, it can make getting a good night’s sleep difficult.

Deep sleepers are the opposite. They may be able to sleep through just about anything! But is it possible for a light sleeper to become a deep sleeper? In this video, clinical psychologist and sleep expert, Dr. Michael Breus, explains the biological processes behind light sleepers and offers some tips and tricks you can use to improve the quantity of your deep sleep each night.

📺 For tips on setting a proper bedtime routine, check out our video:

💤 If you’re ready to take actionable steps to get better sleep, Dr. Breus has developed a 28-day Sleep Wellness Program just for you. With on-demand video, daily emails, and a Sleep Wellness Guide, his program uses science-backed techniques to improve your sleep in as little as three minutes per day! Learn more here:
➡️ Enter code SleepDoctorYT for 20% off!

🧑🏻‍💻Take our Sleep Quiz to receive some of Dr. Breus’s personalized sleep recommendations and begin your journey to better sleep!

0:00 What is a Light Sleeper?
0:49 Light Sleep Stages vs. Deep Sleep Stages
1:19 What are Sleep Spindles?
1:56 Dolphin: The Chronotype of Light Sleepers
2:48 Is it Possible for a Light Sleeper to Become a Heavy Sleeper?
3:06 Tips for Increasing Deep Sleep

😴 Michael Breus, Ph.D., is a double board-certified clinical psychologist and sleep expert. He's been in practice since 1999 and helped thousands of patients improve their sleep. Dr. Breus has written five books on sleep and conducted over 1,000 interviews to the press and public.

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About the Author: Joy Packard

12 Comments

  1. Thanks Dr. B! Dolphin here 🙋🏻‍♀️🐬White noise and a consistent sleep schedule helps me a LOT. I also box breathe and I swear it works almost every night to get me to sleep quickly!

    1. @@victoriaquezadaSo I actually discovered it thru one of his recent videos! It’s breathing in calmly for 4 seconds, and exhaling for 4 seconds. It distracts the brain (and slows heart rate) to where it helps me fall asleep faster so I’m not thinking about anything and everything.

  2. You are the BEST. I have gotten so much help from watching you. I use a fan for the sound to block sounds from our very quiet house. It helps so much.

  3. How are people to find a sleep doctor locally? There is no specialty? Or is there?

  4. Hi, Doc Sleep!! Being a HSP (Highly Sensitive Person) makes me a light sleeper, is there any recommendation as I doubt I can sleep all the way through the night?

  5. It blew my mind when you said 7-9 hours of uninterrupted sleep. I usually have waking periods of 3-5 times a night and get next to no deep sleep. I will try the consistent sleep and wake times to see if that helps

    1. When he said that, I did a double take too, lol, but I *think* he means that it’s sleep that isn’t interrupted by *outside* sources because here’s no way any adult passes out perfectly and sleeps thru the night like a kid! lol Natural wake-ups are totally normal; he was talking about that, (that it’s normal to wake up a couple times naturally), in one of his last videos 👍🏼

  6. I’m highly disappointed on your website. I created a profile after I took the test. It won’t let me login. I clicked on reset password. I got an email with a link to reset. Did so. I still can’t login, so ya know… it’s not worth my time.

  7. not everybody can get 7-9 hours of sleep, you know that is not the reality of everybody.

  8. I was “born” a deep sleeper. I used to be able to sleep 8-10 hours uninterrupted, through a dang earthquake—until the pandemic. Now, the last 4 years I can hear a pin drop in my sleep. Like so many others I’m experiencing insomnia and fragmented sleep for the first time due to lingering, deep seated psychological stress of the pandemic. I’m trying everything I can to help but haven’t found something that works consistently. So I think you can be “born” a deep sleeper and involuntarily become a light sleeper

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